Photo of ash arising from the Guatemalan Volcán de Fuego, taken from the cockpit of a commercial airliner. Such spurts of ash are easily avoided by aviators, but if a large eruption begins suddenly, winds change, or an airplane is flying at night, these hazards become harder to see. Credit: Tom Gonzalez

Photo of ash arising from the Guatemalan Volcán de Fuego, taken from the cockpit of a commercial airliner. Such spurts of ash are easily avoided by aviators, but if a large eruption begins suddenly, winds change, or an airplane is flying at night, these hazards become harder to see. Credit: Tom Gonzalez

Photo of ash arising from the Guatemalan Volcán de Fuego, taken from the cockpit of a commercial airliner. Such spurts of ash are easily avoided by aviators, but if a large eruption begins suddenly, winds change, or an airplane is flying at night, these hazards become harder to see. Credit: Tom Gonzalez

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Alka Tripathy-Lang, PhD

Alka Tripathy-Lang is a freelance science writer based in Chandler, Arizona, and holds a Ph.D. in geoscience.
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