Plume from Bogoslof on February 19, 2017, seen from Unalaska Island, 53 miles east-southeast of the volcano. This photo, captured from a helicopter during fieldwork by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, was taken 14 minutes after this particular explosive event began. Credit: Janet Schaefer and the Alaska Volcano Observatory / Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

Plume from Bogoslof on February 19, 2017, seen from Unalaska Island, 53 miles east-southeast of the volcano. This photo, captured from a helicopter during fieldwork by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, was taken 14 minutes after this particular explosive event began. Credit: Janet Schaefer and the Alaska Volcano Observatory / Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

Plume from Bogoslof on February 19, 2017, seen from Unalaska Island, 53 miles east-southeast of the volcano. This photo, captured from a helicopter during fieldwork by the Alaska Volcano Observatory, was taken 14 minutes after this particular explosive event began. Credit: Janet Schaefer and the Alaska Volcano Observatory / Alaska Division of Geological & Geophysical Surveys

Follow her

Alka Tripathy-Lang, PhD

Alka Tripathy-Lang is a freelance science writer based in Chandler, Arizona, and holds a Ph.D. in geoscience.
Follow her